Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 9th Nano Congress for Next Generation Manchester,United Kingdom.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Gerd Kaupp

University of Oldenburg, Germany

Keynote: Dilemma between ISO and physics in (nano)inden

Time : 9:30 - 10:00

OMICS International Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gerd Kaupp photo
Biography:

Gerd Kaupp has completed his PhD from Würzburg University and Post-doctoral studies from Iowa State, Lausanne, and Freiburg University. He has privately continued his research on “AFM on rough surfaces”. He has published more than 300 papers in renowned journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of several scientific journals.

Abstract:

Since 2000, it is experimentally found and since 2015, physically deduced that pyramidal/conical nanoindentations follow the law of normal force FN = k∙h3/2 but not constant h2 (h=indentation depth). However, the unsupported exponent 2 is still used by the ISO-14577 standard, that industry and government must obey, while it does not concur with physics. Also NIST (2009) continued using h2 for defi ning erroneous mechanical parameters in a tutorial, despite their curves supporting h3/2. Only the precisely validated k and h3/2 allow for a wealth of otherwise unachievable characterizations, such as initial surface eff ects, gradients, phase transitions, transformation energy and activation energy. Arithmetically, h3/2 reveals the 80/20 ratio of indentation- and long-range works, independent of material or method. Unfortunately, also ISO hardness and elastic modulus depend on false h2, and the diff erences between h2 and h3/2 are very large. Th us, present mechanical data from indentations create dilemma between ISO standards and physics. It is however possible to obtain the "physical hardness" solely from the penetration resistance k of the loading curve. All deduced mechanical parameters from indentations are in error when depending on h2 instead of h3/2. Miscalculated materials and composites against physics might be the reason for medical or technical failures even growing to disasters. How shall liabilities in these cases be judged and compensated? 50 years published data require the original data or at least loading curves to be corrected for the sake of daily safety.

OMICS International Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael Hietschold photo
Biography:

Prof. Dr. Michael Hietschold studied physics and completed Ph.D. 1976 in theoretical solid state physics at Technical University Dresden, Germany. He was a postdoc at Quantum Theory Group of Moscow State Lomonosov University, Soviet Union. Since 1993, he is a professor for Solid Surfaces Analysis and head of the Electron Microscopy Laboratory at the Institute of Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Germany. His research interests are surface physics, nanophysics and ultramicroscopy. He was a guest professor at the National University Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and also lecturing at Portland State University, Oregon, USA. Since 2008 he is advisor for the National Metals and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Pathumthani, Thailand. Michael Hietschold is a referee for many international scientifi c journals and research funding organizations and has published about 250 scientific papers. h-index: 27.

Abstract:

The investigation of self-assembled periodic adsorbate structures on crystalline substrate surfaces is a classical topic of surface physics which has been dominated for a long time by diff raction techniques. Th e appearance of scanning probe microscopies – especially scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) – has opened the fascinating opportunity of direct realspace imaging with atomic or submolecular resolution. At the interface between a solution and a crystalline solid, solute (and sometimes also solvent) molecules may deposit in an ordered manner at the solid substrate surface. In-situ studies of the adsorption pattern created this way are possible by ambient STM with the tip immersed in a deposited solution droplet. As an example, trimesic acid (TMA) molecules solved in alkanoic acids may arrange in open adsorption patterns (chicken wire and flower structures) due to H bonding via carboxylic functional groups. At the liquid-solid interface, such type of polymorphism may be controlled by the nature of the solvent (especially its polarity) as well as the concentration of the solutions which opens access to further novel structures. By a controlled increase of molecular packing density of solutions of TMA in alcohols, even a surface-reaction of TMA with coadsorbed solvent molecules (monoester formation with undecanol) has been observed. Recent investigations concerning substrate temperature during deposition and replacement of trimesic acid by the nonplanar benzene-triphosphonic acid will be discussed also. Another approach is based on the self-assembly of molecules at the crystalline surface in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). Under such “ideal conditions” the local electronic structure at the adsorbatesubstrate interface can be studied in detail by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS)offering insighte.g.into highly localized donation-backdonation charge transfer processes. We demonstrate some examples for the adsorption of phthalocyanines and porphyrines on metal surface. As an example, shows a temperature-induced polymerization in a monolayer of brominated Cu-Tetraphenylporphyrin on a Au(111) substrate. Such kind of investigations may open a way to better understanding the conditions of structure formation and control which is permanently encountered in the biotic world and which might become extremely fruitful for future engineering of molecular architectures and devices.

OMICS International Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Oliver G Schmidt photo
Biography:

Oliver G. Schmidt is a Director for the Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Germany.

Abstract:

Nanomembranes are thin, flexible, transferable and can be shaped into 3D microtubular nanomembrane architectures. This makes them attractive for a broad range of applications and scientific research fields ranging from novel hybrid heterostructure devices to ultra-compact 3D systems both on and off the chip. If nanomembranes are diff erentially strained, they deform themselves and roll-up into microtubular structures upon release from their mother substrate. Rolled-up nanomembranes can be exploited to rigorously compact electronic circuitry and energy storage units. They can also serve as ideal platform to study novel photonic and plasmonic phenomena. As rolled-up microtubes can be easily tuned into the size range of single cells, they are perfectly suited to study single cell behavior in ultra-sensitive yet fully integrative lab-in-atube systems. As off-chip components they address exciting environmental and biomedical applications such as biomimetic regenerative cuff implants or powerful self-propelling microautonomous systems. If magnetic tubes or helices are combined with spermatozoa, such hybrid micro-biorobotic motors off er new perspectives towards paradigm shift ing reproduction technologies.

Keynote Forum

Xuewen Shu

Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China

Keynote: Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China

Time : 12:00 -12:30

OMICS International Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xuewen Shu photo
Biography:

Xuewen Shu has completed his PhD from Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), China. He worked as a Senior Scientist at Aston University & Indigo Photonics Ltd., UK during 2001-2013. He is currently a full Professor at HUST. He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals and conferences and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member for two international journals.

Abstract:

Femtosecond-laser inscription/machining technology emerged in recent years as very powerful tool to fabricate microscale/nanoscale structures in transparent and nontransparent materials. Compared with conventional UV-laser inscription technology, fs-lasers can off er some unique advantages. First, the nonlinear nature of the absorption confi nes any induced changes to the focal volume. The spatial confi nement, combined with laser-beam scanning or sample translation, make it possible to micromachine geometrically complex structures in three dimensions. Second, the absorption process is independent of the material, enabling optical devices to be fabricated in compound substrates of diff erent materials. Third, the regions treated by fs-laser have a remarkably high etching rate compared with pristine material, which enable the flexible fabrication of holey structures such as microchannels. Since intense femtosecond laser pulses enable highly localized material modifi cation virtually in any material, it can thus be an excellent tool for the micro- and nano- fabrication of microstructures in a variety waveguides. In this paper, we will discuss some nano- and micro-structure made in diff erent waveguides and material using femtosecond laser. We will also discuss their functionality and potential applications.