Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 9th Nano Congress for Next Generation Manchester,United Kingdom.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Makoto Sakurai

National Institute for Materials Science, Japan

Keynote: Dynamic defect-manipulation induced novel functionality in SnO2

Time : 9:30 - 10:00

Conference Series Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Makoto Sakurai photo
Biography:

Makoto Sakurai got his PhD from Keio University on the topic, "Magnetism And Structure of Magnetic Superlattice". He studied mechanism of atom-manipulation using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and also developed a new technique of STM-induced light emission from atomic structures with the atom-resolved spatial resolution, as a researcher at RIKEN and NIMS. He is studying new functionality caused by dynamic defects-manipulation in wide-band-gap oxide nano/microstructures to achieve new-type computing architectures from 2007 and is also investigating for controlled self-assembly of peptide/molecules from 2013, as a Senior Researcher at NIMS.

Abstract:

Disordered systems have been studied for scientifi c interest and also for unique potential applications. Recently, the conductance of a single-crystal SnO2 microrod on a flexible substrate was found to show reversible semiconductorinsulator transition by applying mechanical stress and an appropriate voltage. The decrease of the conductance is caused by the creation of lattice defects in mechanically bent microrods, because the defects work as trapping sites for carriers. With the increase of the stress, the strain leads to the formation of slip planes in the rutile structure. The microrod changes continuously from its normal semiconducting state to the insulating state by bending the fl exible substrate. Th e insulating state is maintained after releasing the stress. Interestingly, the insulating state reverts to the original semiconducting state by the electrical healing of the defects. The transition can be tuned in a reversible and non-volatile manner. We applied this unique feature in SnO2 microrods to the application of ultraviolet (UV) photodetector, and tried to solve the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) problem in wide-band-gap semiconductors, which originated from a very long lifetime of photo-excited electrons. We demonstrated one solution to the problem by high photoconductive gain (~1.5×109) and quick recovery speed (<1 s) of the simple SnO2 microrod photoconductor. Th e quick recovery speed to the excited electrons with long life time was achieved by a novel “Reset” process: Bending and straightening the microrod and subsequently applying a voltage pulse. We also discuss about unique humidity sensing of the SnO2-based core-shell devices.

Keynote Forum

Uma Batra

PEC University of Technology, India

Keynote: Novel nanocrystalline bioactive coatings for Ti6Al4V bio-implants

Time : 10:00-10:30

Conference Series Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Uma Batra photo
Biography:

Uma Batra is Professor and Head of Department of Materials & Metallurgical Engineering and Dean of Faculty Affairs at PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh, India, a premier institute with a history of more than 100 years. Significantly PEC is the almamater of the late Indo-American astronaut and Aeronautical Engineering student Kalpana Chawla. Her research areas include nano hydroxyapatite for bioimplants, bioactive coatings on metallic implants. She has authored more than 100 research papers in national and international journals. She has delivered more than 50 invited talks in the area of Metallurgy and Materials. She was nominated offi cially in 2007 as the fi rst Indian Woman Engineer Representative to the U.S Society of Women Engineers (SWE) US by a delegation from the American Society of Engineering Education.

Abstract:

Bone is a connective tissue composed of an organic collagenous matrix and a fine dispersion of reinforcing inorganic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, whose synergistic and hierarchical structure renders unique properties to bone tissue in terms of hardness, flexibility and regenerative capacity. Metallic materials offer mechanical properties like resilience and strength required to replicate bone tissue in load-bearing applications. However, the success or failure of an implant depends on its interaction with the surrounding tissue. Thus mechanical as well as biological properties of bone implants should be most favorable for its swift and strong bonding with the bone tissue. Ti6Al4V as bio-implant in orthopedic research received a lot of attention in recent years because of its good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. However, it suffers from release of nickel and chromium ions in human body. In this concern, coatings can be applied to Ti6Al4V to reduce the ion release tendency and also to facilitate the process of bone healing. Hydroxyapatite is the most evident candidate for application as coating to improve the performance of Ti6Al4V bio-implants. The keynote will focus on an overview of recent trends and strategies that are currently being investigated to improve the performance of Ti6Al4V bio-implants in terms of functionality and biological efficacy.

Keynote Forum

Yuko S Yamamoto

Kagawa University, Japan

Keynote: Further perspectives on nanostructures for single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy

Time : 10:50-11:20

Conference Series Nano Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yuko S Yamamoto photo
Biography:

Yuko S Yamamoto is growing as a Spectroscopist particularly based on Raman Spectroscopy and Plasmon-Enhanced Spectroscopy. She studied Raman Spectroscopy and completed her PhD (2011) in Prof. Yukihiro Ozaki laboratory in Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan. Then she started surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) under the supervision of Prof. Tamitake Itoh as a Post-doctoral fellow at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan, and received the research fellowship for young scientists position of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) in Kagawa University, Japan (2014). Her specialties are Raman Spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Her current research interests are plasmon-enhanced single-molecule vibrational spectroscopies i.e., SERS, Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), surface-enhanced coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy (SE-CARS) and surface-enhanced hyper Raman scattering (SEHRS).

Abstract:

The concept of “Single-molecule spectroscopy” becomes widely known in recent days, particularly aft er the nobel lecture in chemistry in 2014, which is entitled “Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy” by the novel laureate W. E. Moerner. Th is talk focused on the development of super-resolved fl uorescence microscopy using fl uorescent tags attached to specifi c molecules. While, as a spectroscopist, one can expect the phrase “single-molecule spectroscopy” to directly obtain the vibrational information from any type of single specifi c molecule by this technique, since we know that the important technical backgrounds for it may already exist as i.e., surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS), surface-enhanced coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (SE-CARS) or surface-enhanced hyper Raman scattering (SEHRS). Th ese plasmon-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies have a certain potential to detect any type of molecules at single-molecule level. However, only few specifi c molecules were reported as target molecules at single-molecule level using SERS, TERS, SE-CARS and SEHRS, therefore, the conceptual steps remains to realize a further achievement on “Single-molecule spectroscopy”. In this meeting, we will discuss perspectives for what will be needed to complete the single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy. Every researchers working on plasmon-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy (SERS, TERS and SE-CARS), vibrational spectroscopy and/or plasmonics are all welcome to the meeting. Nanotechnology for plasmon-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy will also be discussed as an important topic.

  • Nano Science and Technology ; Advanced Nanomaterials ; Nanobiomaterials ; Molecular Nanotechnology ; Nano Systems and their Design ; Nano Materials Synthesis and Characterisation ; Nano Computational Modelling ; Further perspectives on nanostructures for single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy

Chair

Michael Hietschold

Technische Universität Chemnitz, Germany

Co-Chair

Yuko S Yamamoto

Kagawa University, Japan

Biography:

Eda Göz has completed her PhD from Ankara University. She is a Research Assistant of Chemical Engineering department, Ankara University.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to design a 3D-construct capable of delivering multiple growth factors in a controlled manner for bone tissue engineering applications. Platelet derived growth factors(PDGF-BB) and bone morphogenic protein-6 (BMP-6) were loaded in gelatin microparticles and poly (3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) sub-micron particles to acquire diff erent release kinetics. Growth factor carrying particles were loaded in 3D chitosan scaff olds prepared by freeze-drying. Release kinetics of dual delivery was investigated in-vitro by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The effect of single or dual delivery of PDGF-BB and BMP-6 on osteoblastic diff erentiation and proliferation was evaluated by using MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts for 21 days. Th e viability of MC3T3-E1 cells was followed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) at 1,3,5,7, 14 and 21st days of culture period. Cell morphology and mineral formation was detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis at the 4th, 7th, 14th days. Real Time Protein Chain Reaction (RTPCR) was performed to clarify the osteogenic diff erentiation. For this purpose gene expressions of β-actin, RunX2, collagen type I (Col I), osteocalcin (OCN) and osteopontin (OPN) of the MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell cultures were evaluated for 7,14 and 21st days of culture period. As a consequence of this study, PDGF-BB release is faster than BMP-6 release. Th e faster release of PDGF-BB from scaff olds resulted in an increased MC3T3-E1 cell population on chitosan scaff olds. According to the RT-PCR results, osteogenic markers of RunX2, Col I, OPN were higher on scaff olds loaded with growth factors either individually or in combination. Moreover, OCN expression and bone mineral formation were remarkable on scaff olds incorporating PDGF-BB and BMP-6 as a combination.This result was compatible with SEM and EDX analysis of chitosan scafold that include both PDGF-BB and BMP-6.

Biography:

Fatemeh Bahadori has completed her PhD at Istanbul Technical University, Department of Organic Chemistry. She has had a year of Assistantship at University of Ilinois at Chicago, USA during her course of PhD studies. She is an Assistant Professor at Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul-Turkey since 2014. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and two chapters in international books.

Abstract:

During the last decades, delivering biologically active molecules using nano materials (nano drug delivery systems; NDDS), have gained increasing attention in a wide range of applications from sensing and imaging to treatment of disease. Th e superior properties of nano materials provide numerous feasibilities such as controlling the release of drugs, targeting and imaging of cancer tumors, increasing serum half-life of bioactive molecules, passing over blood brain barrier etc. By targeting cancer side, it is possible to obtain a better efficacy with a lower dose of the chemotherapeutic agent. However, this would be possible only if the material used in synthesis of nano-drug delivery system is both biocompatible and biodegradable. Nano-micelles made of amphiphilic materials are superior in all above-mentioned properties compared to other NDDS. They simultaneously form in aqueous media and this provides easy production especially in industrial scale. However, their application has been associated with some stability problems and not all amphiphilic materials are non-toxic. According to our studies, natural materials show the best toxicity profi le in vivo and it is possible to enhance their stability using some other natural products as well. In this presentation, we will discuss synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of micelles made of organic natural materials such as phospholipids, chitosan and glycolipids. We will compare their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity compared to synthetic polymers.

Biography:

Martin Ntwaeaborwa is Professor of Physics at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa. He has published more than 190 articles and has given numerous invited talks at local and international conferences. He is the Director of UNESCO-TWAS Centre of Excellence for advancement of science in
developing countries

Abstract:

There has been a growing demand to develop low cost but effi cient solar cell devices either to compete on an equal footing basis or to replace conventional multicrystalline photovoltaic cells. Th is has called for development of new advanced materials, new generation and confi guration of solar devices. Because of this, photovoltaic industry has, in the past few decades, experienced
rigorous transformation where traditional solar cells formed by compact semiconductor layers have been joined by new kinds of cells constituted by complex mixture of organic, inoroganic and solid or electrolyte materials and rarely rely on charge separation at nanoscale. In addition, new materials based on a combination of large bandgap semiconducting metal oxide, ceramic and metal oxide/sulfi de nanocomposites that are transparent and conductive and have low electrical resistance are being developed to improve the power conversion effi ciency of the new generation of solar cell devices. We synthesized rare-earths (Er3+, Tm3+, Yb3+) doped Al2O3-TiO2 metal oxide nanocomposites and examined their structure, particle morphology and photoluminescent properties. We demonstrated the intense infrared to visible upconverted luminescence in Al2O3-TiO2 co-ativated with Er3+-Tm3+ and Er3+-Yb3+ when excited using the fi bre coupled 980 nm laser. The mechanism responsible for upconversion that involves the sequential two photon absorption will be discussed. These materials were evaluated for use as upconversion layers in solar cells.

Biography:

Satoshi Sasaki has completed his PhD in 2006 from Kyoto University and worked as a Post-doctoral fellow at Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l'Ecole Normale Supérieure (France) and Northwestern University (USA) from 2006-2008. He has been an Assistant Professor of the ISIR, Osaka University (Japan) between 2008 and 2015 and joined the University of Leeds in 2015 as a Lecturer in the School of Physics and Astronomy. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as guest editor of a special issue of Crystals focused on “Topological Crystalline Insulators: Current Progress and Prospects”.

Abstract:

Inspired by the discovery of topological insulators, material science on topological quantum phase that has shed light on Berry phase physics of wavefunctions has been of great interest. Notably, various types of topological materials have been searched and studied to demonstrate novel phenomena that can be derived from exotic properties of elementary excitations such as Dirac, Wyle, or Majorana fermions (MFs). In particular, searching for MFs – particles that are their own antiparticles, and therfore uncharged – is challenging but important for developping future quantum technologies. Topological materials that can superconduct are candidates to host the MFs at their surfaces. Recently, by tailoring metal-impurity levels in topological crystalline insulator tin telluride (SnTe) samples, we have observed surprisingly robust superconducting behaviour. In my talk, we will report the fi rst successful growth of superconducting indium-doped SnTe (Sn1-xInxTe) nanoplates on Si substrates by a simple vapour transport method without employing any catalyst. Th e relation between the critical temperature and the carrier density was found to be consistent with that of bulk single crystals, suggesting that the superconducting properties of the nanoplate devices are essentially the same as those of bulk crystals. With the help of nanofabrication, growing the superconducting nanostructure crystals has opened exciting perspectives to fabricate devices for Majorana-based topological quantum computations.

Biography:

Werner Lottermoser has completed his thesis work about neutron diffraction and magnetism of special silicates from Francfort University (Germany) and University Lecturing Qualifi cation on Single Crystal Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SCMBS) in 1996 from Salzburg University (Austria). He is now working on sub-nanometric imaging, nanomaterials and materials for industrial applications. He has published more than 65 papers in reputed journals and 150 abstracts and has been serving e.g. for one year as a referee board member at the Journal of Physical Chemistry A. Recently, he was awarded the Austrian Staatspreis for Innovation together with AB-Microelectronics, Salzburg.

Abstract:

Several years ago, spectroscopy and diff ractometry have still been treated as different methods with different kinds of scientific conclusions. However, by our studies it has become possible to unify a special branch of spectroscopy, Single Crystal Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SCMBS)/NMR/NQR and, on the other hand, X-ray/Synchrotron and Neutron Diffractometry. Moreover, the results of DFT calculations could be implied as well. The common link is the electric field gradient that can be experimentally derived from the spectroscopic methods, theoretically by DFT and semi-quantitatively by diffractometry through Fourier inversion of difference electron densities (DEDs). We have created a special sophisticated soft ware system which is able to show these DEDs fl oating threedimensionally in space within the crystal unit cell together with the relevant efg. By this it is possible to gain an uncompared insight in structure-property relationships in as much as some of the above spectroscopic and diff ractometric methods are sensitive to magnetism. For the first time, at least to our knowledge, real (not simulated!) atomic/molecular 3d orbitals can be seen by the viewer, the reason due to which the method is called Difference Electron Nanoscope (DEN). Since 3D viewing on a screen without tools is difficult to achieve, a special procedure is applied to perform a rather striking 3D imaging. Th e method is demonstrated on special examples. With further achievements in synchrotron diff raction and data processing, however, it should be possible to dispose of an online-version of the DEN within a couple of years.

Tamitake Itoh

National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan

Title: Examination of strong interaction between plasmon and molecular exciton by surface enhanced spectroscopy
Biography:

Tamitake Itoh has completed his PhD in 2002 from Osaka University and has done postdoctoral studies in Kwansei Gakuin University during 2002 to 2005. He
is currently the Senior researcher of National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. He has published more than 100 papers in
reputed journals.

Abstract:

Electromagnetic (EM) enhancement of the molecular optical responses close to plasmonic nanostructures used in surface enhanced spectroscopy enables us ultra-sensitive detection and in situ characterization. Recently, the research fields of EM enhancement have entered a new research regime wherein the enhancement eff ects are connected to plasmon-induced photochemical reactions. For this regime, the theorem used to understand the EM enhancement eff ect should be re-examined, because such photochemical reactions are beyond the assumptions in the theorem. Th us, the EM mechanism firstly is summarized by using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which is the most general optical response using an EM enhancement, and determine the limitations of the  EM mechanism in SERS. Secondly, we discuss the necessity of re-examining the EM mechanism with respect to three breakdowns of the approximations in Fermi’s golden rule: the breakdown of the molecular electronic dynamics by the ultra-fast plasmonic deexcitation, the breakdown of the weak coupling between the plasmon and molecular exciton by strong EM enhancement, and the breakdown of the selection rule of SERS by the field-gradient eff ect. Th ese breakdowns allow the observation and control of molecular functions that remain hidden by previous spectroscopic methods.

Biography:

Chiara Busa’ has completed her scientifi cally oriented secondary school in 2005. She obtained her BSc in 2009 in Chemistry and Master’s in Chemical Science in 2012 from the University of Florence (IT). She moved to Sweden, where she was consultant in Applied Physics at Chalmers University of Technology (SE). In 2014, she joined Pola Goldberg-Oppenheimer group (Advanced Nano-Materials, Structures and Application) to undertake her PhD in Chemical Engineering at the
University of Birmingham (UK).

Abstract:

DNA nanotechnologies had a major development during the last two decades. Th eir real potential and versatility began to be investigated and understood with the synthesis of a polyhedron-structured DNA molecule. Due to the intrinsic properties of DNA and developments in sequence design, diff erent polyhedral, either in shape and/or dimensions were synthesised. Custom-tailored properties and high yields are characteristic of these structures. In this project, the main work was represented by the disposition, anchoring and imaging of self-annealed DNA polyhedron, with high yield and stability of the molecules. Th e last step consists in formation a gold layer on top of the pre-annealed DNA polyhedron, in order to build a specifi cally-patterned gold materials with optical responses. According to previous studies, specific strands of DNA sequence were designed, to anneal and form a geometric 3D tetrahedron, with >90% yield. Th e anchoring of the DNA structures was carried out on TEM carbon grids, where the structures where demonstrated to firmly immobilise on the surface. Hence, the gold layer deposition was carried out by electroplating, due to the conductive nature of the TEM grid employed. AFM and TEM are the predominant techniques carried out for characterizing the structures and their disposition on the substrates in each stage of this work.

Biography:

She was born in 11 May 1990, Izmir. She graduated from Bergama Anatolian High School and completed Chemistry at Pamukkale University. Graduated from
Pamukkale University in 2012. After graduation she works for a year as a teacher. In 2013 she starts to study Chemistry as a master student at İzmir Instıtute of Technology. She is still studying her thessis project . She is interested in particle scienes, colloid chemistry and interfacial phenomenon. She also tend to biomaterials and bio-designed systems.

Abstract:

When formulated in a nano-particulate form, chitosan (CS) has proved to be a very eff ective agent for drug delivery owing to its extremely attractive properties such as its pH sensitive character and its solubility in aqueous medium. Therefore, the synthesis of micelle embedded chitosan nano particles that are suitable for oil soluble drugs was the purpose of this study. However, even production of nano-sized chitosan particles with well-defined morphology and stability is diffi cult by using the classical gelation route. Therefore, a new production method that combines ionic gelation and three phase emulsion (o/w/o) techniques in an interesting way was used and micelle embedded chitosan nano particles were able to manufacture successfully. These nano-particles were then characterized using TEM, FTIR and DLS-LDV.

Biography:

Sabina Yeasmin has completed her MSc in Biochemistry from West Bengal State University and currently persuing PhD from Polymer Science & Technology department of University of Calcutta. She was the topper in MSc and got the DST-INSPIRE fellowship. She has two publications in reputed journals and one book chapter.

Abstract:

This paper introduces green synthesis of shape controlled silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through mutual actions of Acacia nilotica and tamarind kernel powder (TKP).Th e AgNPs have been characterized using several techniques. Resultant particles were further studied for exertion of cytotoxic eff ect on diff erent cancer cell lines. Morphological study shows that the nanoparticles are mostly spherical in shape with a range of particle size of 10-42 nm. Results showed that the IC50 dose of Ag NPs is capable of significantly elevating intracellular reactive oxygen species and diminishing mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating the eff ective involvement of apoptosis in cell death. These results clearly show that the nanoparticles have excellent biomedical application.